Working with the Weather to Hunt for Deer

 

Deer Hunting pic
Deer Hunting
Image: deeranddeerhunting.com

An experienced finance professional, Daniel Reardon is co-CEO and trustee of the Otto Bremer Trust in Minnesota. Outside of his responsibilities at Otto Bremer, Daniel Reardon is an avid hunter.

When you’re hunting for deer, it is critical to work with the weather rather than against it. Hunters can find deer more readily by thinking critically about the responses of deer to the weather.

In calm and dry weather, deer tend to remain bedded for the majority of the day. If you are hunting alone, move around and search for deer. If you are hunting with others, stay in one spot and let the other hunters push the deer out into view.

In a storm or heavy wind, deer will find sheltered areas, so look under dense cover and evergreens. The barometer will fall just before a storm and trigger deer to find food regardless of time of day. When this happens, deer will be in fields and other places with food sources. Immediately after a storm breaks, the deer will return to these areas to feed.

Otto Bremer Trust Supports Mankato, Minnesota, Nonprofits

 

Daniel Reardon Otto Bremer
Daniel Reardon, Otto Bremer

A co-CEO and trustee of Otto Bremer Trust in St. Paul, Minnesota, Daniel Reardon helps lead the trust in its mission of providing financial assistance to nonprofit organizations in the Upper Midwest through grants and program-related investments. In 2016, Daniel Reardon helped guide the organization toward a record year of giving that benefited nonprofits in Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North Dakota. Of the $47.3 million distributed, more than $400,000 went toward programs in the Mankato, Minnesota, area.

Mankato-area nonprofits that received grants and program-related investments used funds to launch new programs and maintain existing ones. Funds also enabled recipients to relieve financial stress on regular operating costs, particularly since the grants account for some of the largest contributions the organizations have ever received. Furthermore, many of the awards included undesignated grants that give nonprofits the ability to disperse funds wherever necessary.

The Open Door Health Center received the biggest portion of the $409,125 allotted to the Mankato area. The grant amounted to $150,000, which the organization will put toward opening new dental clinics in the Cottonwood and Clarkfield communities of southwest Minnesota. Other recipients included Leisure Education for Exceptional People, the Mayo Health Clinic System in Mankato, and the Lake Crystal Area Recreation Center.